BAA Comet Section : Comets discovered in 2020

Updated 2020 July 3


  • 2014 OG392 (PanSTARRS)
  • A/2020 A1 (A/NEOWISE)
  • 2020 A2 (Iwamoto)
  • 2020 A3 (ATLAS)
  • A/2020 B1 (A/PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 B2 (Lemmon)
  • 2020 B3 (Rankin)
  • 2020 BS7 [A/Lemmon]
  • 2020 BZ12 [A/PanSTARRS]
  • 2020 BU13 [A/PanSTARRS]
  • 2020 EP [A/Lemmon]
  • 2020 F1 (396P/Leonard)
  • 2020 F2 (ATLAS)
  • 2020 F3 (NEOWISE)
  • 2020 F4 (394P/PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 F5 (MASTER)
  • 2020 F6 (PanSTARRS)
  • A/2020 F7 [/A/Lemmon]
  • 2020 F8 (SWAN)
  • 2020 G1 (P/Pimental)
  • 2020 H1 (395P/Catalina-NEAT)
  • 2020 H2 (Pruyne)
  • 2020 H3 (Wierzchos)
  • 2020 H4 (Leonard)
  • 2020 H5 (Robinson)
  • 2020 H6 (ATLAS)
  • 2020 H7 (Lemmon)
  • 2020 H8 (PanSTARRS)
  • A/2020 H9 [A/PanSTARRS]
  • 2020 HB11 [A/Lemmon]
  • 2020 J1 (SONEAR)
  • 2020 K1 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 K2 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 K3 (Leonard)
  • 2020 K4 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 K5 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 K6 (Rankin)
  • 2020 K7 (PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 K8 (Catalina-ATLAS)
  • 2020 K9 (P/Lemmon-PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 KU7 [A/PanSTARRS]
  • 2020 M1 (P/PanSTARRS)
  • 2020 M2 (P/Lemmon)
  • 2020 M3 (ATLAS)

  • When observing a comet please try to forget how bright you think the comet should be, what it was when you last viewed it, what other observers think it is or what the ephemeris says it should be.

    The equations for the light curves of comets that are currently visible use only the raw observations and should give a reasonable prediction for the current brightness. If the comet has not yet been observed or has gone from view a correction for aperture is included, so that telescopic observers should expect the comet to be fainter than given by the equation. The correction is about 0.033 per centimetre. Values for the r parameter given in square brackets [ ] are assumed. The form of the light curve is either the standard m = H0 + 5 log d + K0 log r or the linear brightening m = H0 + 5 log d + L0 abs(t - T + D0) where T is the date of perihelion, t the present and D0 an offset, if L0 is +ve the comet brightens towards perihelion and if D0 is +ve the comet is brightest prior to perihelion.

    Observations of comets in 2020 are given in ICQ format. 

    Full details of recently discovered objects will not appear until they are available on the CBAT web pages. The actual accuracy of preliminary orbits is often (nearly always) much worse than the published accuracy implies.  In part this is because each orbital solution is treated as a mathematical construct and does not take account of observational error.  JPL does publish the errors, whereas the MPECs do not.


    2014 OG392 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 21st magnitude asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on 2014 July 28.50. There were additional pre-discovery observations back to 2011 July. The object, originally classified as a Centaur, is at perihelion at 10.0 au in 2021 November and has a period of around 40 years. CBET 4731 [2020 March 16] reports that a coma was noted in six images taken with large telescopes between 2017 July and 2019 December. It seems a long time for cometary activity to go unreported.
    A/2020 A1 (A/NEOWISE)
    An 20th magnitude object was discovered from the NEOWISE satellite on January 1.76. It was posted on the PCCP as N00g0p4. No cometary activity has been detected. [MPEC 2020-A119, 2020 January 12] The object was at perihelion at 1.7 au in 2019 December.  JPL classify it as a Centaur.
    2020 A2 (Iwamoto)
    Masayuki Iwamoto, Awa, Tokushima-ken, Japan, discovered a 13th magnitude comet on two CCD frames taken on January 8.86 with a 10-cm Pentax 400-mm-f.l. f/4.0 lens and a Canon EOS 6D camera. It was posted on the PCCP as IF033. Following posting, Gennady Borisov confirmed the 15th magnitude comet in frames taken on January 13.15. [CBET 4714, 4715, MPEC 2020-132, 2020 January 13/15] The comet was discovered at perihelion at 1.0 au.   Despite describing the orbit as very preliminary and with only five observations over a five day arc, Dan Green gives four decimal places for the angular elements on the CBET. A similar orbit, based on six observations is provided by Hirohisa Sato.  The orbit suggests that whilst it may brighten a little, it will not become brighter than 13th magnitude. Its elongation will increase, but it is a morning object. Some visual observations suggest that it may be as bright as 9th magnitude.
    2020 A3 (ATLAS)
    A 19th magnitude comet was discovered in images taken with the 0.5m Schmidt at Mauna Loa on January 7.60. by the ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System) team. It had been posted on the PCCP as A10jo2S. [CBET 4716, MPEC 2020-B60, 2020 Janaury 21]. The comet was at perihelion at 5.8 au in 2019 June.
    A/2020 B1 [PanSTARRS]
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered an asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on January 19.37. The object, classified by JPL as a Trans-Neptunian Object, was at perihelion at 1.7 au in 2019 December and has a long period orbit with aphelion at 100 au. It was placed on the PCCP as P10W9bB. No cometary activity has been detected.
    2020 B2 (Lemmon)
    The Mt Lemmon Survey discovered a comet of 21st magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector on January 19.45. It was placed on the PCCP as C1T0QN2. Richard Miles was amongst those making confirming observations. [MPEC 2020-C110, 2020 February 6]. The comet was near perihelion at 2.8 au. It is in a long period orbit of around 500 years.
    2020 B3 (Rankin)
    David Rankin discovered a comet of 19th magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector on January 29.44 during the Mt Lemmon Survey. It was placed on the PCCP as C20NF62. There were pre-discovery images from PanSTARRS on January 25. [MPEC 2020-C111, 2020 February 6]. The comet was at perihelion at 3.4 au in 2019 October. For some reason JPL currently classify it as a Jupiter-family comet.
    2020 BS7 [A/Lemmon]
    The Mt Lemmon Survey discovered an object of 20th magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector on January 19.08. [MPEC 2020-B163, 2020 January 25]. It was placed on the PCCP as C1RWKU2. The object was at perihelion at 0.4 au in 2019 November and has a period of around 5.4 years. JPL classify it as an Apollo asteroid and an NEO.
    2020 BZ12 [A/PanSTARRS]
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered an asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on January 19.62. The object, classified by JPL as an Apollo asteroid and an NEO with MOID of 0.08 au, is at perihelion at 0.6 au in 2020 April and has a retrograde orbit with a period of around 20 years. It was placed on the PCCP as P10W6lW. No cometary activity has been detected.
    2020 BU13 [A/PanSTARRS]
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered an asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on January 25.30. The object, classified by JPL as an Apollo asteroid and an NEO with MOID of 0.06 au, was at perihelion at 0.1 au in 2019 December and has an orbit with a period of around 4 years. It was placed on the PCCP as P10WTyQ. No cometary activity has been detected.
    2020 EP [A/Lemmon]
    The Mt Lemmon Survey discovered an object of 21st magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector on March 2.44. [MPEC 2020-F03, 2020 March 16]. It was placed on the PCCP as C2AJT22. The object was at perihelion at 2.5 au in 2020 February and has peiodic orbit of around 30 years. JPL classify it as a Centaur.
    2020 F1 (396P/Leonard)
    Gregory J Leonard discovered a comet of 20th magnitude in images taken with the Mt Lemmon Survey 1.5m reflector on March 16.33. It was placed on the PCCP as C2CU0U2. There were pre-discovery images from PanSTARRS in 2019 January, December and 2020 January and from Mt Lemmon in 2020 February. [CBET 4736, MPEC 2020-F144, 2020 March 26]. The comet was at perihelion at 4.0 au in 2019 August and has a period of 18 years.

    With a published orbit, several researchers looked for pre-discovery observations in archival data, coming up with observations made in 2002 March.  It was given a designation of 2002 F4 for this return. The linked orbit shows that the comet made a close pass of 0.0074 au to Saturn on 1936 May 7. Prior to that time the orbit had a perihelion distance of around 9.0 au and a period of 37 years - a typical Centaur. It has since made moderately close passages to both Jupiter and Saturn. [CBET 4737, 2020 March 27, MPEC 2020-K92, 2020 May 21]


    2020 F2 (ATLAS)
    A 19th magnitude object was discovered in images taken with the 0.5m Schmidt at Haleakala on March 21.62 by the ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System) team. The next day it was detected by PanSTARRS, who noted a coma. It was posted on the PCCP as A10kZLv. Prediscovery images from PanSTARRS were found from 2019 May, August and 2020 February. [CBET 4739, MPEC 2020-G04, 2020 April 1]. The comet was at perihelion at 8.8 au in 2022 July.
    2020 F3 (NEOWISE)
    An approximately 17th magnitude comet was discovered from the NEOWISE satellite on March 27.71. It was posted on the PCCP as N00gbay. Several observers confirmed the cometary nature, including John Drummond who showed an image during the BAA webinar on 2019 Y4 on the evening of April 1. [CBET 4740, MPEC 2020-G05, 2020 April 1/2] The object is at perihelion at 0.3 au in 2020 July.  Michael Mattiazzo noted that the comet already appeared to be about 13th magnitude, which implied a significantly brighter absolute magnitude to that used in the CBET.  This would be in line with NEOWISE magnitudes often being fainter than the equivalent visual magnitude.  

    Marco Goiato was able to observe the comet on April 21 and 26 in his 0.22m reflector when it was rapidly brightening at 11th magnitude.  The final ground based observation before perihelion was by Michael Mattiazzo on June 10 when it was about 6.8 in his 15x70B.  It moved into the SOHO C3 field on June 22, when it was around 2nd magnitude and had brightened to around 0th magnitude when it left the field on June 27.  Post perihelion it moves rapidly into northern skies.  Nicolas Biver reported it as about 1st magnitude in 7x50B on July 3.  It will fade fairly rapidly but could remain visible until the end of August.


    2020 F4 (394P/PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on March 24.52. It was placed on the PCCP as P10YaJ8. Very quickly, Richard Weryk of PanSTARRS found pre-discovery images from 2009, 2011 (when it was given the designation 2011 GN5), 2018, 2019 and 2020. Additional NEAT images were then found from 2002. The object was effectively stellar in 2009 and 2011. [CBET 4742, MPEC 2020-G64 2020 April 6] The comet was at perihelion at 2.7 au in 2019 November and has a period of 9 years.
    2020 F5 (MASTER)
    The MASTER team reported the discovery of a 16th magnitude comet in ATEL 13619 on April 6. The comet was found using the MASTER (Mobile Astronomical System of the Telescope-Robots) auto detection system with the robotic 0.4m f/2.5 reflector at San Juan, Argentina on March 28.25, with images from earlier in March then found in data collected by the system at the SAAO, Sutherland, South Africa. It was confirmed by other observers and formally announced by the MPC and CBAT. [CBET 4745, 4746, MPEC 2020-G73, 2020 April 8]. The comet will reach perihelion at 4.3 au in 2021 March.  It might reach 14th magnitude, but will not be well placed for observation from the UK.
    2020 F6 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered an object in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on March 21.61, with a coma being reported the next day. It was placed on the PCCP as P10XLLe. [CBET 4748, MPEC 2020-G74 2020 April 8] The comet was near perihelion at 3.5 au.
    A/2020 F7 [A/Lemmon]
    The Mt Lemmon Survey discovered an object of 20th magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector on March 22.23. [MPEC 2020-G78, 2020 April 10]. It was placed on the PCCP as C2DHE12. The object will reach perihelion at 5.3 au in 2021 November and is in a very long period orbit with a high inclination. It has not so far shown any cometary activity. JPL classify it as a Trans-Neptunian Object.
    2020 F8 (SWAN)
    Michael Mattiazzo reported a possible comet of around 10th magnitude in SWAN images between April 1 and April 7 via the comets-ml on April 10. Preliminary orbits were quickly calculated by several amateurs, with a consensus that it was in a retrograde orbit with perihelion around 0.4 au towards the end of May. This would bring it into view for UK observers from mid May, when it might be a 4th magnitude object. The comet was placed on the PCCP as SWAN01 by the MPC, though the CBAT use the designation SWAN20B. CBET 4750 giving a preliminary orbit was issued on April 11. It is possible that the comet is in outburst, in which case its future brightness is uncertain. The MPC chose to designate the comet as 2020 F8 (rather than G1) because SWAN images showing the comet on March 25 were subsequently found. [MPEC 2020-G94, 2020 April 12].  It became another of the spring 2020 comets that failed to survive perihelion.
    2020 G1 (P/Pimental)
    Eduardo Pimental discovered a 15th magnitude comet in images taken by himself, Christovao Jacques and Joao Ribeiro de Barros on April 13.90 with the "Southern Observatory for Near Earth Research" (SONEAR) 0.28-m f/2.2 astrograph at Oliveira, Brazil. It was soon confirmed by many other observers. There was some uncertainty about the orbit, with the discovery MPEC (issued at 04:22) giving ellipital ellements with a period of 8.6 years based on observations from April 13 - 17 and including a description by Dan Green dated as June 16. The MPEC will presumably be re-published. The CBET (issued at 04:52) gives both parabolic and ellipitical elements, the latter with a period of around 11 years based on observations from April 13 - 16. [CBET 4754, MPEC 2020-H06, 2020 April 17] Further observations suggest an orbit with a period of 7 years, which would imply an approach to Jupiter in 2007, but this remains uncertain.  [CBET 4759, 2020 April 28].  Further, for some reason unpublished, observations now give a still uncertain orbit with a period of about 6.8 years and no Jupiter approach. [CBET 4773, 2020 May 13].  JPL, without access to these observations currently give an orbit with eccentricity of 0.86, perihelion at 0.5 au and a period of 7.0 years +/-0.1 years. This orbit gives a Jupiter MOID of 0.25 au and an Earth MOID of 0.27 au, though with no recent close approaches. 
    2020 H1 (395P/Catalina-NEAT)
    2005 JD108 (P/Catalina-NEAT) was recovered on 2020 April 26.08 by Erwin Schwab in images taken by Diana Abreu with the 1.0m reflector at the ESA Optical Ground Station, Tenerife. The recovery was confirmed by P Breitenstein with the Faulkes-North   [CBET 40nn, MPEC 2020 H-2020, 2020 April 28]  The comet has perihelion at 4.1 au in 2021 December and a period of 16.8 years.
    2020 H2 (Pruyne)
    Teddy (Theodore) Pruyne discovered a comet of 16th magnitude in Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt on April 26.47. It was placed on the PCCP as C166T11 and quickly confirmed by Michael Jaeger and other astrometrists. [CBET 4761, MPEC 2020-H220, 2020 April 28]. The comet was close to perihelion at 0.8 au.
    2020 H3 (Wierzchos)
    Kacper Wierzchos discovered a comet of 19th magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector of the Mt Lemmon Survey on April 25.45. It was placed on the PCCP as C2MWPV2. [CBET 4762, MPEC 2020-H221, 2020 April 28]. The comet is at perihelion at 2.3 au in 2020 June.
    2020 H4 (Leonard)
    Gregory Leonard discovered a comet of 20th magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector of the Mt Lemmon Survey on April 21.47. It was placed on the PCCP as C2KXCV2. [CBET 4766, MPEC 2020-J21, 2020 May 3]. The comet is at perihelion at 0.9 au in 2020 August. If the absolute magnitude is brighter than provisionally determined it might get within visual range at the time of perihelion.
    2020 H5 (Robinson)
    James Robinson discovered a 19th magnitude comet in images taken with the 0.5m Schmidt at Haleakala on April 22.33 by the ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System) search programme. It was posted on the PCCP as A10lBfp. [CBET 4767, MPEC 2020-J22, 2020 May 3]. The comet is at perihelion at 9.4 au in 2020 October.
    2020 H6 (ATLAS)
    A 19th magnitude comet was discovered in images taken with the 0.5m Schmidt at Haleakala on April 22.34 by the ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System) team. It was posted on the PCCP as A10lExP. [CBET 4768, MPEC 2020-J23, 2020 May 3]. The comet is at perihelion at 4.7 au in 2021 October.
    2020 H7 (Lemmon)
    Gregory Leonard discovered an asteroidal object of 21st magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector of the Mt Lemmon Survey on April 29.42. It was placed on the PCCP as C2PJ842. Follow-up astrometry by other observers, including Peter Birtwhistle, showed cometary features. [CBET 4777, MPEC 2020-K107, 2020 May 21]. The comet is at perihelion at 4.4 au in 2020 June.
    2020 H8 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 2 discovered a 20th magnitude object in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on April 30.58. The MPEC says it was reported as an NEO candidate, whilst the CBET says it was reported as cometary. It was placed on the PCCP as P20ZU1k. [CBET 4778, MPEC 2020-K110, 2020 May 21] The comet is at perihelion at 4.7 au in 2020 June.
    A/2020 H9 [A/PanSTARRS]
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 22nd magnitude object in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on April 28.42. It was placed on the PCCP as P20ZMLy. No cometary activity was detected. [MPEC 2020-K165, 2020 May 25] The object was at perihelion at 2.6 au in 2019 December and is in a retrograde near parabolic orbit.
    2020 HB11 [A/Lemmon]
    The Mt Lemmon Survey discovered an asteroidal object of 22nd magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector of on April 18.32. It was placed on the PCCP as C2KGVW2, however no cometary features were detected. [MPEC 2020-K199, 2020 May 27]. The obect is at perihelion at 4.8 au in 2020 August and has a retrograde orbit with a period of around 70 years.  JPL classify it as a Centaur.
    2020 J1 (SONEAR)
    Christovao Jacques reported a 17th magnitude object in images taken on May 1.27 with the "Southern Observatory for Near Earth Research" (SONEAR) 0.28-m f/2.2 astrograph at Oliveira, Brazil. Cometary features were then reported in follow-up astrometry. [CBET 4769, MPEC 2020-J37, 2020 May 4] The comet is at perihelion at 3.3 au in 2021 April.
    2020 K1 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 2 discovered a 20th magnitude object in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on May 17.51. The MPEC says it was reported as an NEO candidate, whilst the CBET says it was reported as cometary. It was placed on the PCCP as P210rpD. PanSTARRS then found pre-discovery images from April. [CBET 4779, MPEC 2020-K111, 2020 May 21] The comet is at perihelion at 3.1 au in 2023 June.
    2020 K2 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 2 discovered a 20th magnitude comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on May 21.57. It was placed on the PCCP as P210KhL. [CBET 4781, MPEC 2020-K155, 2020 May 24] The comet was at perihelion at 8.2 au in 2018 December.
    2020 K3 (Leonard)
    Gregory Leonard discovered a comet of 18th magnitude in Catalina Sky Survey images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt on May 22.45. It was placed on the PCCP as C184DV1 and quickly confirmed by Peter Birtwhistle and other astrometrists. [CBET 4782, MPEC 2020-K159, 2020 May 25]. The comet was close to perihelion at 1.6 au.  It briefly appeared again on the PCCP as A10nJin at the end of June.
    2020 K4 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 20th magnitude comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on May 20.53. It was placed on the PCCP as P110DoO. [CBET 4783, MPEC 2020-K162, 2020 May 25] The comet was at perihelion at 1.8 au in 2020 March.
    2020 K5 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 21st magnitude comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on May 25.51. It was placed on the PCCP as P110Z97. THe PanSTARRS team found pre-discovery images from both PanSTARRS telescopes in April and from PanSTARRS 2 in May. [CBET 4785, MPEC 2020-K205, 2020 May 28] The comet will reach perihelion at 1.5 au in 2021 June.
    2020 K6 (Rankin)
    David Rankin discovered a comet of 21st magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector on May 26.37 during the Mt Lemmon Survey. It was placed on the PCCP as C2W2MW2. [CBET 4788, MPEC 2020-L03, 2020 June 1]. The comet is at perihelion at 6.0 au in 2021 August.
    2020 K7 (PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 20th magnitude comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on May 30.55. It was placed on the PCCP as P111acy. [CBET 4790, MPEC 2020-L09, 2020 June 2] The comet will reach perihelion at 5.7 au in 2021 October.
    2020 K8 (Catalina-ATLAS)
    The Catalina Sky Survey submitted observations of objects in images taken with the 0.68m Schmidt on May 25.43, 28 and 29. The ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System) team submitted observations of a potential NEO in images taken with the 0.5m Schmidt at Haleakala on June 7.56. Rob Weyrk suggested that these were all the same object and it was posted on the PCCP as A10nc78. Cometary features were then detected by several astrometrists, both amateur and professional. [CBET 4796, MPEC 2020-L46, 2020 June 12] The comet is at perihelion at 0.5au in 2020 September. Although the provisional absolute magnitude is quite faint, visual observations often produce brighter estimates. The comet could be 13th magnitude or brighter around the time of perihelion.
    2020 K9 (P/Lemmon-PanSTARRS)
    The Mt Lemmon Survey discovered an asteroidal object of 21st magnitude in images taken with the 1.5m reflector of on May 22.43. PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 20th magnitude asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on May 26.58. On June 16 Gareth Williams linked the two objects, along with a third reported by ATLAS on May 29. It was placed on the PCCP as C2UM9W2, and cometary features were detected. [CBET 4797, MPEC 2020-M26, 2020 June 18]. The comet is at perihelion at 2.8 au in 2021 February and has a period of around 8.6 years. The comet passed 0.06 au from Jupiter in 2016 April.
    2020 KU7 [A/PanSTARRS]
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered an asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on June 14.3. The object, classified by JPL as an Trans-Neptunian Object and the MPC as a Centaur, is at perihelion at 4.2 au in 2021 March and has a retrograde orbit with a period of around 200 years. It has a Jupiter MOID of 0.26 au. It was placed on the PCCP as P111lTq. No cometary activity has been detected.
    2020 M1 (P/PanSTARRS)
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered a 21st magnitude comet in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on June 17.37. There were prediscovery PanSTARRS observations from May 24 and 28. It was placed on the PCCP as P111H4A. [CBET 4800, MPEC 2020-M76, 2020 June 23] The comet was at perihelion at 2.7 au in 2019 December and has a period of 11 years.  The orbit has a Jupiter MOID of 0.02 au and the comet will pass 0.69 au from the planet in 2021 October.
    2020 M2 (P/Lemmon)
    Hirohisa Sato recovered 2012 SB6 in images taken with the 0.51-m f/6.8 iTelescope astrograph at Siding Spring on June 29.82, with confirming images with the 0.43-m f/6.8 iTelescope astrograph at Mayhill the following day. The linked orbit shows that the comet passed 0.14 au from Jupiter in 1928 September, just before its 1928 perihelion; prior to that close approach, the orbit had q = 4.58 au and e = 0.20. [CBET 4807, MPEC 2020-N01, 2020 July 1]
    2020 M3 (ATLAS)
    The ATLAS (Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System) team discovered a 19th magnitude object in images taken with the 0.5m Schmidt at Mauna Loa on June 27.58. It was posted on the PCCP as A10nHge and subsequently noted as cometary by several astrometrists. [CBET 4808, MPEC 2020-N11, 2020 July 3]. The comet is at perihelion at 1.3 au in 2020 October. It may reach around 14th magnitude near the time of perihelion.
    2020 ML1 [A/PanSTARRS]
    PanSTARRS 1 discovered an asteroid in images taken with the 1.8m Ritchey-Chretien on June 16.36. The object, classified by JPL as an Trans-Neptunian Object, was at perihelion at 2.5 au in 2020 April and has a perpendicular orbit with a period of around 300 years. It was placed on the PCCP as P111w33. [MPEC 2020-M73, 2020 June 23] No cometary activity has been detected.
    Ephemerides of current comets are available on the CBAT ephemeris page and positions of newly discovered comets are on the Possible Comet Confirmation Page.
    More information on LINEAR. A list of comets discovered by selected search programs.
    The Northumberland refractor is the telescope that was used in the search for Neptune. It now has a 0.30-m f20 doublet lens which gives a stellar limiting magnitude of around 15 at the zenith on good nights. The Thorrowgood refractor was built in 1864 and has a 0.20-m f14 doublet lens; it is currently out of action as the dome has stuck.
    Published by Jonathan Shanklin. Jon Shanklin - jds@ast.cam.ac.uk